Justin Welby’s Neocon Proclamations and the Civilizational Clash with Islam

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The former oil executive and Etonian Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, recently stated that there was a need to move away from the notion that ISIS has “nothing to with Islam”:

“If we treat religiously-motivated violence solely as a security issue, or a political issue, then it will be incredibly difficult – probably impossible – to overcome it… A theological voice needs to be part of the response, and we should not be bashful in offering that… This requires a move away from the argument that has become increasingly popular, which is to say that Isis is ‘nothing to do with Islam’, or that Christian militia in the Central African Republic are nothing to do with Christianity, or Hindu nationalist persecution of Christians in South India is nothing to do with Hinduism.. Until religious leaders stand up and take responsibility for the actions of those who do things in the name of their religion, we will see no resolution.

The argument seems ostensibly balanced. After all, the theological element is mentioned as a factor (albeit a defining one) and Welby highlights the Christian militia in CAR, as well as the Hindu nationalist persecution, though, limiting it to Christian persecution whilst ignoring the rape and killing of Kashmiri Muslims by an army overseen by the fascist PM of India, Narendra Modi. However, the reporting, language and timing of his statements, upon closer inspection, reveal a smokescreen for a continued agenda to target Islam.

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Countering Terrorism with the MCB

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study published in the Journal of Neuroscience some years ago provided insight into learning and in particular, learning from one’s mistakes. The study found that good learners demonstrated greater neural activity and would use feedback not only to check their past performance, but also to adjust their next performance accordingly.

From an Islamic perspective, of course, this not exactly a ground-breaking discovery.  The Qur’an encourages believers to take stock of history in an admonitory fashion:

“Has the news of those before you not reached you – the nation of Nuh, Aad, and Thamud?”[1]

Well before Foucault was exploring the concept of the “technologies of the self”, Islam had encouraged individual spiritual accountability by pondering over one’s deeds and actions.  Reflection is key to forging ahead in a manner where mistakes are not repeated. It contextualises the succinct narration of the Prophet, peace be upon, found in Bukhari,

“The believer is not stung from the same hole twice”.

This brings us neatly to recent events involving the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB).  The MCB’s behaviour has been somewhat strangely masochistic, enjoying an impending second sting with open arms.

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Does the Orlando Attack have *something* to do with Liberalism too Maajid Nawaz?

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The War on Terror has produced industries which feed off misery and violence.  Arms and fuel industries are the most obvious. With the response to attacks in the West defined by neoconservatives, and the focus being ideology, the psuedo-scientific counter-extremism industry has blossomed.

Every time an attack happens, these nefarious individuals and organisation, clearly established to lend credence to neoconservative policies of various shapes and hue, are rejuvenated.  They feed off violence. The attacks in Orlando a couple of days ago once again brought these organisations and individuals back into action.

Maajid Nawaz, as per form, and sounding like a broken record, did not hesitate to drag Islam into the equation once more:

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Inverting the Culturalist Anlaysis, Focus on Ideology and the Argument “it has *Something* to with Islam”

Source: Twitter, @CityNews

Whilst the impassioned feelings after the attacks in Paris against civilian targets are one of sadness followed by rage, it would be safe to say that for the Muslim minorities in the West, the overall reaction is one of shock followed by continued anxiety.

This anxiety has varying sources and manifests itself in different ways.  From Muslims feeling compelled to apologise for crimes they neither condone or have any part in, to being publically compelled to condemn such attacks.  The anxiety is exasperated when Muslims witness the hypocrisy in such calls and take a principled stand in order to avoid political exploitation. Muslims are witnesses to similar atrocities against people of other faiths, geography and race, yet privileged elite in Parliament are not seen to issue a condemnation against such regular terrorism – as a matter of principle, why should public and vocal condemnation be forcibly extracted on certain violence as the state eye is rendered blind when the violence is born from Western policy? I am yet to see mass condemnatory statements for Palestinian babies being burned to death by Jewish settler terrorism, or Palestinian civilians shot to death “intentionally and unlawfully” by IDF terrorists (who also happen to run over two year old toddlers), from the Cameron government or the various state-authorised counter extremism organisations for that matter. And indeed, I do not see the Jewish community being asked to condemn or apologise. This suggests such calls are ideologically and politically driven rather than rooted in humanity.  Only white/Westernised power-structures are worthy of solidarity.

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