I am CAGE

IamCAGE

In a time of universal deceit – telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

-George Orwell

The words of Malcolm X could not be truer: The powers that be use the press to give the devil an angelic image and give the image of the devil to the one who’s really angelic.  In the context of CAGE, Mohammed Emwazi and the contribution toward radicalisation by the security services, the British media, as I had envisaged, completely trivialised and then steered the discussion way from the excesses of the security services. Echoing the experience of the journalist Gary Webb, the focus of the right-wing media has been to character assassinate those who have come out to share this evidence-supported narrative.

The attack on Asim Qureshi and CAGE has been insidiously appalling from the likes of the Daily Fail and other papers in cahoots with the neoconservative establishment.  This reached its zenith when, in a clear attempt to undermine the lucid arguments of Asim Qureshi Andrew Neil from the British Biased Corporation decided to question his personal theological opinions.

The only card that could be used was that of demonisation through a completely unrelated topic, invoking the presumptuous “do you believing in stoning women?” question, courtesy of a report which references a far-right bigot published by the bigoted Council of Ex-Muslims, such is the level of journalistic rigour at the British Biased Corporation.

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Democracy Now asks “Did U.K. Security Agencies Play a Role in ISIS Militant’s Radicalization?”

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After Noam Chomsky endorsing Asim Qureshi’s analysis of the radicalisation of Mohammed Emwazi, Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman called Qureshi onto their show to further explore the topic.

The video can be seen at the link here.


 

Crosspost: Democracy Now!

We look at the strange case of the man nicknamed Jihadi John, the Islamic State militant seen in the beheading videos of James Foley and Steven Sotloff. Last week, press accounts identified him as a Londoner named Mohammed Emwazi who was originally from Kuwait. Emwazi moved to Britain as a child and studied computer science at the University of Westminster. The story has touched off a debate in Britain over policing and monitoring of potential threats. How did Emwazi go from being a university student in Britain to being the face of the Islamic State? Did British security services play a role in his radicalization? We are joined by Asim Qureshi of the British prisoner group CAGE, who knew Emwazi until he left Britain for good in 2012.

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The Consistency of CAGE and Hypocrisy of Boris Johnson

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Boris Johnson is upset.  From Facebook fulminations to Torygraph tirades, he clearly has been incensed by the release of information by CAGE about Mohammed Emwazi and the resultant impact on the normally plane-sailing, “blame ideology” narrative.  In doing so, he repeats much of the same confused, irrational and emotionally charged rhetoric which clearly misrepresents what CAGE have been stating.  I have addressed some of these misrepresentations in previous blogs (here and here).

Asim Qureshi yesterday called into an LBC interview with Johnson to clarify his position. Johnson, with a degree more calm, proceeded to repeat the same as the above: more irrationality and more irrelevant dictations. It must be emphasised that the interview was ridiculously biased, with Qureshi repeatedly muted, making way for Johnson to make his point.

I was planning on doing a point by point analysis of the discussion, however, many of the accusations made against Qureshi have been brilliantly batted back by himself in a BBC interview. It must be heard. See this link here.  (Note that this is not the full interview, other accusations are dealt with in the full interview, here.) No doubt had Qureshi been given an equal opportunity to respond, he would have shown Johnson’s superficial cries to be unsubstantiated.

There were a couple of points I wanted to elaborate on regarding Johnson’s statements.

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The CAGE/Emwazi Emails: Managing Perceptions of a Counter-Terror Policy in Crisis

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Through the 90s, Gary Webb, an award winning journalist, experienced the wrath of the CIA through the corporate media for exposing CIA’s link with the Contras in Nicaragua and the cocaine epidemic in the US. There was a suggestion that the black communities were being targeted with these drugs. An internal CIA document authored by Nicholas Dujmovic, an employee of the CIA Directorate of Intelligence at the time of publication, noted the “already productive relations with journalists,” which allowed the CIA’s reputation to be left intact thanks to distractions by major newspapers. Webb’s career was destroyed and some years later, was ruled to have committed suicide with two bullets to his head. Much of his core findings however, were found to be accurate. As the Intercept spread articulates, the corporate media spent,

“ …far more time trying to poke holes in the series than in following up on the underreported scandal at its heart, the involvement of U.S.-backed proxy forces in international drug trafficking.”

More interestingly, Dujmovic wrote that the papers had deflected the core allegations, using stories which cited, “[r]espected columnists, including prominent blacks.” In other words, people “representing” the black communities, which were enraged by the allegations, had been abused to successfully shift opinion.

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